Eat The List: The Tomato

The Lovely Tomato

Think of the tomato as a large, red, good-looking multi-vitamin, and try to remember it wouldn’t hurt to take one each and every day.  Tomatoes deliver an alphabet city of important nutrients—Vitamins A, C, E, K, Bs, E for starters.  The cooked tomato has an added bonus; even a little cooking in olive oil releases the highly- touted anti-oxidant lycopene, which has proven in studies to have tremendous impact on fighting certain cancers, including prostate.  Last but not least—you’d be hard put to find someone who doesn’t like tomatoes; they make almost any dish more festive and flavorful.  Eat them year round, one way or another.  See The Recipes section for a way to enjoy them in winter.

A 3 Course Meal, Dr. Colbert Style

Eating healthy food doesn’t mean giving up on taste or wonderful meals. In fact, Dr. Colbert dines in style and still manages to Eat the List.  Look at all the vitamins, nutrients and anti-oxidants he receives with this five star, three course dinner.  

  1. salad A bright green salad complete with Spinach for vitamins and nuts for a splash of protein….
  2. leek soup Next came the leek soup – delicious yet nutritious. Plus, soup is a great warm up for any dinner during the cold weather!
  3. fish The main course was fish with beans and anti-oxidant rich spices, topping off an excellent dinner.

There was no dessert for Dr. Colbert, but if you really need something sweet keep in mind that whole fruit is rich with flavor and packs a burst of natural sweetness without the health and beauty risks of refined sugar. 

If you have any three course meals that are High School Reunion Diet approved, we’d love to hear about them.  Just comment below.

HSR Diet Sneak Peek

SNEAK PEEK: GLYCEMIC INDEX

In The High School Reunion Diet, we’ll discuss Smart Carbs vs. Dumb Carbs.  (Contrarry to popular opinion, all carbs aren’t bad for you; in fact, Smart Carbs are essential.)  One way to tell the difference between Smart and Dumb is to know the food’s ranking on the Glycemic Index.  The GI was created by scientists as a rating devise, to gage how quickly a food turns to glucose in our systems.  Slow (and low) as re: sugar is the name of the game here—high glycemic foods spike blood sugar and create cravings for more high glycemic foods, putting you on a constant blood sugar roller coaster and contributing to both weight gain and aging. 

 

On the GI, foods are ranked relative to a piece of white bread, which has a GI Index of 100.   (Read: instant glucose)

 

Highest GI:  100 plus

High GI:  70 plus

Med GI:  56-69

Low GI:  55 or less

Great GI:  20 or less

 

If you need to lose weight, stick with the Great GI to Low GI foods until you see real results; you can broaden your selections upwards later.  If you just want to look good, go low through medium.  High glycemic foods should be avoided for health and beauty reasons on the daily diet permanently (in The High School Reunion Diet we learn from a dermatologist how sugar makes our skin look old)–except for a well-earned dessert or the occasional splurge.  For the full Index showing how foods in our daily diets rank according to how fast they turn to sugar, see The High School Reunion Diet.  For a taste of what’s to come, compare the breads listed below with low and medium GI vegetables.  It doesn’t take a genius to instantly recognize what’s far better for your health and looks.

 

 

GI INDEX (excerpted from The High School Reunion Diet)

 

Breads

Bagel                                             103

Baguette                                    136

English Muffin                           110

Hamburger Bun                           87

Kaiser Roll                                    105

Multi-Grain                                     61

Oat Bran                                      68

Pita                                             82

Poori                                             117

Rye                                             71

Rye, Light                                    97

Tortilla, Corn                           74

Tortilla, Wheat                           40

Wheat                                    76

White                                             100

White, Enriched                           110

 

Vegetables (with Great GI, ie, under 20)

Artichoke

Arugula

Asparagus

Broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

Cabbage

Cauliflower

Celery

Cucumbers

Escarole

Eggplant

Beets

Chard

Collard Greens

Kale

Mustard

Spinach

Turnips

Lettuce

Mushrooms

Okra

Peppers

Green Beans

Snow peas

Squash

Watercress

Zucchini

 

Vegetables (w/ low-med GI)

Tomatoes                           23

Sweet Potato                  63

Yams                                    53

 

FYI, a baked white potato clocks in at a GI of 158.  Mashed?  123.  Even if you don’t need to lose weight (and The High School Reunion Diet isn’t just about weight loss), change your favorite potato to a sweet one or a yam.  It’s a far healthier, skinnier, sexier choice—and intelligent choices like this on a daily basis will keep your body young and your skin glowing.

Tea

Antioxidant-Rich Tea

Antioxidant-Rich Tea

Excerted from The Lists, The High School Reunion Diet:

Tea. It’s a warm and cozy—or a cold and refreshing—sip of smart medicine. The medicinal qualities of various teas have been suspected for centuries, but lately, studies have proven a specific benefit for regular tea drinkers against cardiac illnesses and heart attack, against prostate and other cancers.  The key health ingredient in tea is the catechins in the leaves–a category of flavenoids.  Dermatologists love tea for the skin repair and protection potential, particularly when it’s flavored with lemon—a combo that’s been shown to protect against skin cancer.  Black, white and green teas are all good for anti-aging.  The only issue with tea seems to be that to get the benefits, you have to drink quite a lot of it.  Try it at least twice a day with a snack when on a mission to lose weight; it’s a treat with no carbs, no fat, no calories. (Unless of course, you imprudently put them in.)  It may be an acquired taste, but learn to drink tea straight, with lemon, and okay, maybe a little honey; over time, it could have untold health and beauty benefits.

True Food: Turmeric

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Eat The List

Spice: Turmeric.  Used for thousands of years as one of nature’s highly potent anti-oxidants, this magical spice has a rep today for improving medical problems small (cuts, bruises, surface skin conditions) and large (many types of cancer, Alzheimer’s).   It’s a natural painkiller.  It’s reputed to help metabolism, thus weight control.  The Chinese use it to fight depression.  It can reduce swelling and ease discomfort associated with arthritis.  And it can help improve your skin.    Turmeric may sound exotic, but it’s really not: it’s found in curry, and is a member of the ginger family.  Turmeric has a beautiful saffron hue and a mustardy taste.  It’s famous ingredient is the phytochemical curcumin, which gives it its gorgeous orange color.  Turmeric qualifies in our book as a True Food, one you should find ways to eat often.  Get in the habit of adding turmeric to egg dishes, egg salads, chicken dishes, curried fish, meat and vegetables.  It will only improve your dish and your health.

Quick-Grill Indian Chicken Breasts

Here you’ll make a minute marinade with fresh ginger and ground turmeric and cook the spiced chicken on the barbeque.

Combine

6 tablespoons peanut oil

6 teaspoons soy sauce

2 1/2 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger

2 tablespoons minced garlic

1 tablespoon fresh grated lemon peel

1 teaspoon ground turmeric

2 skinless boneless chicken breast halves

Course salt and ground pepper

Prep

Start the barbecue.  Combine all ingredients except the chicken in a glass bowl, and reserve ¼ cup for serving.  Coat the chicken on both sides with the remaining marinade.  Grill over medium-high heat until done, about 7 minutes per side.

Recipe: Fantastically Foxy Spinach

High School Reunion Diet’s Fantastically Foxy Spinach

You will want a large skillet for this simple method of making spinach (on the Eat It List)—btw, one of the most nutritient-packed green things on planet earth.

You will want an amount of spinach that fills up your large skillet.  Spinach shrinks, so buy plenty per person; two huge handfuls at least, or 12 oz. to a pound each.

Make this spinach dish a staple in your daily diet; the more you eat the more your body gets the health and beauty benefits, and the more quickly you lose weight, improve your skin and recover your youth.

1) Wash spinach very thoroughly in a colander and don’t dry.  Even if it’s pre-washed, rinse it under the faucet.  (It’s safer to rinse it, and you want the spinach wet.)

2) Put the spinach in the large skillet, turn the heat on medium high, and cover.  The water that’s on the leaves will steam the spinach.  Stir ocassionally and cook a couple of minutes, until the spinach wilts.  Drain off any remaining water.

3) Peel a large clove of garlic and cut it in half.  Impale one of the pieces with a fork.  This is what you will use to stir the spinach.

4) Add a couple of tablespoons of olive oil to the skillet.  Turn heat to medium high, and stir the spinach quickly with the garlic on the fork.  Add a sprinkle of kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, and cook 2-3 minutes.

5) Serve with a squeeze of fresh lemon.

Eat The List: Spinach

The High School Reunion Diet Home Ec section features lists of the best foods on earth — and gives a memorable education on why we want to make a daily habit of List Foods. Watch here for featured items, and advice on how to cook them to retain the full potency of their natural nutrients.

List Food of the Day: Spinach

Spinach has such a long list of kick-ass nutrients it’s almost impossible to remember them all. It’s rich in antioxidants that promote skin beauty and internal health. It contains B vitamins, Iron, Coenzyme Q10, plant-derived Omega-3s, Vitamin K, Calcium, Betaine and Caretenoids.

Forget it; maybe it’s easier to remember why it’s so good to get these things on a regular basis from the food you eat. So just remember that spinach has proven powers to prevent cancer– including stomach, lung, colon, ovarian, prostate and breast cancer. It helps your eyesight; it prevents stroke, arterial and coronary disease and slows cognitive decline. It tastes good. And it makes you even better looking. So do as Grandma said and eat your spinach.

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